Luxury4Play.com banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is the first year I will be attempting this. We have a nice large turkey we will be oven roasting but I got a nice 14lb bird from my company so I will be injecting it with a nice mild hot sauce and frying it :clap:


If you have done this and have tips... lets here it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,391 Posts
Yes stay far far away from the house.also when you are ready to put the bird in make sure the burner is off turn it back on once the bird is in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
We've fried our Turkeys for the past 5 or 6 years now (plus a few holiday parties) and it's awesome! The crispy skin with creole or cajun seasoning on the outside is awesome.

Tips -
  • Make sure that your turkey is fully defrosted and dry. Water is what causes the oil to splatter and boil over as the water has a much lower boiling point than oil - splattering oil means people get burned and drop the turkey creating a mess of 400°F frying oil that gets people injured. I'd wear long sleeves and pants just in case anything splatters, you'll get a little bit regardless.
  • In the morning, place the uncooked turkey in your pot and fill with water until just covering the turkey, remove the turkey and note how high the water level is on the pot. That is the amount of oil that you need to add for frying. Don't just fill it up with oil and drop the turkey in, as you'll likely have too much oil and cause problems for yourself. Lower the turkey slowly into the oil when it's ready, think of it like working your way into a hot tub, lower a few inches at a time and let it settle, then a bit more until the whole thing is in the pot.
  • Do use lots of seasoning butter, oil, and sauces to inject the turkey - the flavor is great - but inject well into the meat and not at the skin surface
  • Do season the outside of your turkey as well since the seasoning gets cooked into the outside layer. I cover mine liberally with cajun and creole seasoning, and it's delicious
  • We fry ours for typically 3 minutes per pound. Then I'll pull the turkey out and slice into the breast to check for doneness if it needs a few more minutes or not.
  • Pay attention to the oil temperature while frying; I keep mine between 350-375°F. An average 15lbs Turkey is about ~45 mins to cook. I usually watch it for the first 5 minutes to make sure temps are stable, and then come back outside for the last 10 minutes. You may want to just stay nearby for your first ones and drink a beer.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. As long as you measure the oil ahead of time and have a dry turkey when you lower it into the oil (slowly), I've never had any problems frying one - no spills or fires. It's pretty easy, it's really fast, and they taste amazing!

Happy Thanksgiving!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,736 Posts
Most important:

When your turkey is done and your ready to pull it out, turn the oil off and bring it over to my house!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,464 Posts
I've tasted fried turkey only once and thought it was disgustingly horrible. Maybe the guy who cooked it did something wrong. I don't know but i hated it. So many people rave about it so I'll give them the benefit of doubt that the one I tasted wasn't cooked properly. But it wasn't even slightly good so I can't imagine anyone could make it to my liking.

Regular turkey for me...now and forever more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
I would guess that it was made improperly, as I've always loved thanksgiving and turkey in general. I felt like frying them added another dimension to it, and all the meat stays moist. Since the skin and outer layer cooks quickly, all of the moisture stays in with the meat.

You can re-use the oil once or twice, if cooking another one shortly thereafter - say for a holiday party a couple weeks after thanksgiving. Now I've had people that reuse their oil for several months and it gets dirty, and they can be pretty bad if the oil isn't fresh. Most of the kits that include the oil claim that it'll last 6 months, I dont honestly believe that though. The quality goes down hill pretty quickly after a few weeks or a few turkeys fried in the oil. So maybe you tasted one that had been fried in oil that was already used several times??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,464 Posts
I have no interest in trying it again as I like my turkey the regular way. I wouldn't eat a NY strip steak fried and feel the same way about turkey. I don't knock others for liking fried turkey though. Different strokes for...............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Thanksgiving is over so this post is just about useless but here is the process for getting the right amount of oil. Put turkey in fryer, pour in water until you reached your desired oil level, remove turkey, mark water line, empty water, fill oil to line.

:bow1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
^Useful again :bow1:

Last year turned out perfect! I will be doing it again as I just got the bird from my company again :lol:

Anyone have any interesting fried turkey recipes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,265 Posts
I wanted to fry it but my wife wanted to make the bird and leave the rest for me. So she's baking it.

There's always next year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
We've fried our Turkeys for the past 5 or 6 years now (plus a few holiday parties) and it's awesome! The crispy skin with creole or cajun seasoning on the outside is awesome.

Tips -
  • Make sure that your turkey is fully defrosted and dry. Water is what causes the oil to splatter and boil over as the water has a much lower boiling point than oil - splattering oil means people get burned and drop the turkey creating a mess of 400°F frying oil that gets people injured. I'd wear long sleeves and pants just in case anything splatters, you'll get a little bit regardless.
  • In the morning, place the uncooked turkey in your pot and fill with water until just covering the turkey, remove the turkey and note how high the water level is on the pot. That is the amount of oil that you need to add for frying. Don't just fill it up with oil and drop the turkey in, as you'll likely have too much oil and cause problems for yourself. Lower the turkey slowly into the oil when it's ready, think of it like working your way into a hot tub, lower a few inches at a time and let it settle, then a bit more until the whole thing is in the pot.
  • Do use lots of seasoning butter, oil, and sauces to inject the turkey - the flavor is great - but inject well into the meat and not at the skin surface
  • Do season the outside of your turkey as well since the seasoning gets cooked into the outside layer. I cover mine liberally with cajun and creole seasoning, and it's delicious
  • We fry ours for typically 3 minutes per pound. Then I'll pull the turkey out and slice into the breast to check for doneness if it needs a few more minutes or not.
  • Pay attention to the oil temperature while frying; I keep mine between 350-375°F. An average 15lbs Turkey is about ~45 mins to cook. I usually watch it for the first 5 minutes to make sure temps are stable, and then come back outside for the last 10 minutes. You may want to just stay nearby for your first ones and drink a beer.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. As long as you measure the oil ahead of time and have a dry turkey when you lower it into the oil (slowly), I've never had any problems frying one - no spills or fires. It's pretty easy, it's really fast, and they taste amazing!

Happy Thanksgiving!
Aaannnddd this has tipped me over the edge, definitely trying it. Sounds delicious.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top