Luxury4Play.com banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Out of all the books you have read, which ones do you feel had the most impact or really resonated with you?

When I was a child, I lived on my bicycle or in the library. I loved to just dive head first into a book and just read for the sake of reading. I haven't read as much as I would have liked to in recent years, but have been trying to devote more time to just read lately. I think it is important in this fast paced world to slow down sometimes and gain knowledge or perspective the old fashioned way.

A few that I couldn't put down...

Inspirational:
Greatest Salesman in the World

Fiction:
The Great Gatsby

Non-fiction:
Touching the Void
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,872 Posts
a way for looking at the world:
thousand year of nonlinear history by de landa
fountainhead by rand
short stories by borges

fiction:
blood meridian by mccarthy
crying of lot 49 by pynchon
from hell by moore
crash by ballard
invisible cities by calvino


- chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
iWoz by Steve Wozniak
The Driver by Alex Roy
The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich
The Adventure Capitalist by Conor Woodman



"iWoz" is a look into Steve's life and his accomplishments. I really enjoyed it.

In "The Driver", Alex tells some untold stories of his rally experiences. Good for Gumball fans.

"The Accidental Billionaires" was a interesting story of how Facebook became. There is a movie coming out soon and the trailer is similar to the book. Not necessarily the best writer, but I read it because I was curious about the "scandalous" story.

"The Adventure Capitalist" is highly recommended. The author traveled the world in search of old trading cultures. He wanted to see if one can still trade the old fashion way and still make a buck.

I read half of American Psycho just now...


Out of these 5 books, iWoz and The Adventure Capitalist really inspired me to work harder in my projects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
The Great Gatsby

One of the best book threads that I’ve come across is 'The Great Gatsby', a book that takes you back to the Jazz Era, with a tale of love and revenge, and infidelity and hypocrisy. It’s a tale of `everything is fair in love and war’. Jay Gatsby is our protagonist who makes futile attempts to bring Daisy, his love from the past, into his present. Mind you, she is a married woman now (with a husband who is cheating on her!). But like I said, everything is fair in love and war. Gatsby’s death in the end brings about a finality to this story. It couldn’t have ended otherwise. Did you know that Shmoop has a good guideline to this book? It sure helped me to really savor this American classic in all its
Razzmatazz!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
875 Posts
The best book i have read is "Gang lead for a day" overview-

As a young graduate student fresh off an extended stint following the Grateful Dead, Venkatesh began studying urban poverty. With a combination of an ethnographer's curiosity about another culture and some massive naïveté, he gathered firsthand knowledge of the intricacies of Chicago's Robert Taylor projects. Early on, he met a megalomaniac gang leader known here as J.T., who became his mentor. Venkatesh observed and learned how the crack game works, and how many have their fingers in the pie and need life to remain the way it is. He observed violence, corruption, near homelessness, good cops, bad cops, and a lot of neglect and politics-as-usual. He made errors in judgment—it took a long time for his street smarts to catch up to his book smarts—but he tells the story in such a way as to allow readers to figure out his missteps as he did. Finally, as the projects began to come down, Venkatesh was able to demonstrate how something that seems positive is not actually good for everyone. The first line in his preface, "I woke up at about 7:30 a.m. in a crack den," reflects the prurient side of his studies, the first chapter title, "How does it feel to be black and poor?" reflects the theoretical side, and both work together in this well-rounded portrayal.—Jamie Watson

I recommended to anyone who likes non-fiction. enjoy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
Spiritual: The Tibetan Book of the Living and Dying
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top