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For all of you that have regular water heaters and are worried about taking 5 minutes for the shower to warm up just install a recirculation pump.
My Rinnai unit takes roughly 8 seconds to heat the water before sending it down the pipes. I can't complain too much about adding ~8 seconds to the normal time it takes for the hot water to reach the faucet.
 

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My Rinnai unit takes roughly 8 seconds to heat the water before sending it down the pipes. I can't complain too much about adding ~8 seconds to the normal time it takes for the hot water to reach the faucet.
This is dependent on how far your faucet is from your water heater. In order for your hot water to come out of the faucet, the entire length of pipe has to first empty all of it's cold water that is sitting in it.
 

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^ That's going to be the case regardless of whether you have tankless or a tank. Think about how long it takes for the hot water to get to your faucet now and add ~8 seconds to it if you switch to tankless. Not a big deal IMO, but if you want instant hot water you'll have to look at some of the previously mentioned solutions.
 

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^ That's going to be the case regardless of whether you have tankless or a tank. Think about how long it takes for the hot water to get to your faucet now and add ~8 seconds to it if you switch to tankless. Not a big deal IMO, but if you want instant hot water you'll have to look at some of the previously mentioned solutions.
Yes of course....

I just realized I misread what you were trying to say in your previous post.
 

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^ The place I stayed in Puerto Rico last month had one that was terrible. Get a quality unit and have it properly installed and you won't have a problem. Mine doesn't fluctuate in temperature at all unless someone else turns on a shower or starts laundry/dishes while I'm in the middle of showering. Even then I just turn down the cold a little bit and it provides plenty of hot water.
 

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^ The place I stayed in Puerto Rico last month had one that was terrible. Get a quality unit and have it properly installed and you won't have a problem. Mine doesn't fluctuate in temperature at all unless someone else turns on a shower or starts laundry/dishes while I'm in the middle of showering. Even then I just turn down the cold a little bit and it provides plenty of hot water.
+1
 

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so these are available with natural gas or just straight electricity?
My current tank is powered by natural gas. Would a retrofit be an easy task??

This is something i REALLY wished I had thought of while building my home :(
They are available in both Natural Gas or electric. However I would not recommend the electric one, they draw a huge amount of power to run. The natural gas ones are great.

The difficulty of the retrofit depends on you current setup. It's usually never technically it's just a function of labor which is determined by how much plumbing needs to be redone.
 

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Please excuse my ignorance on THIS subject :D

Would it require more than just swapping out the tank and placing the tankless unit inline with the Natural gas and Water line?

I took pics of everything while the house was being built......


This is in my garage. I want to go tankless before I build "walls" around it when the garage gets completed.

Im going to call for estimates but I want to know what the job requires so that I dont have to listen to any (potential) BS.

Thanks for all your help guys!
 

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I actually work in the HVAC field. from what I know of these, they are great, at first. if you loose power, no hot water, replacement parts can get expensive. if it's not properly sized, you will have continous problems with not getting enough hot water. most of units require a 3/4" ga sline to them, so from the get go they use more gas. granted they will run as long as a normal hot water tank, because it only has a couple of gallons of water to heat up, rather than 40 gallons. I have seen these installed incorrectly many times. If you do intend on getting one, get at least 5 estimates from reputable contractors. DO NOT SETTLE FOR THE CHEAPEST!!! they are usually cheap for a reason, they don't know how to install or service them! Also, do your research on the brands you get estimates on.

Good Luck!

if I can be of any assistance, email me [email protected]
 

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also, i see from the photo the walls are all drywalled in, your local jurisdiction may require fire rated walls behind the unit.
 

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Please excuse my ignorance on THIS subject :D

Would it require more than just swapping out the tank and placing the tankless unit inline with the Natural gas and Water line?

I took pics of everything while the house was being built......


This is in my garage. I want to go tankless before I build "walls" around it when the garage gets completed.

Im going to call for estimates but I want to know what the job requires so that I dont have to listen to any (potential) BS.

Thanks for all your help guys!
Your conversion looks fairly straight forward. Should be a pretty simple swap.
 

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Make sure you get the tax credit (if you qualify) and check with your gas company to see if they offer a credit for installing a more efficient device.

Tax Credit:
Tankless Tax Credit | Rinnai America Link goes to Rinnai website, but it is not specific to any manufacturer.

I got around $700 back on tax credit and $100 back from my gas company.
 

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dont get a cheap one, I had one at my lakehouse and the low flow issues drove me insane
 

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most of units require a 3/4" ga sline to them, so from the get go they use more gas. granted they will run as long as a normal hot water tank,
They actually don't use more gas, that is the key benefit to them. It takes the same amount of BTU's to heat water no matter what type of heater you are using. The advantage of these systems is they use about 98% of the BTU's when burning the gas to heat the water, compared to the more conventional systems that use somewhere between 80-85% with the rest being wasted.
 

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What about hooking up a water softener to a tankless water heater? Has anyone done this?
Yes, we've done it.

Water comes in the house, splits to a feed line where we don't want water softener treatment (outside hose bibs, kitchen sinks, fridg. ice maker, etc) and the other side of the split feeds the rest of the house, which, feeds the tankless water heater(s) in their respective locations. (one downstairs, one upstairs)
 
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