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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Back when I was a kid my mom's colleague and best friend wanted to run a corporation. It may help you while reading this to understand that my mom's friend was a genius. She already had a Ph.D in education, so she up and enrolled in Cumberland law where she got a business law degree. This was simply just for the sole purpose of running this corporation. She didn't need the law degree--She just wanted it just because she knew she could do it in her sleep. I thought that was other-worldly.

So, here I am contemplating purchasing a supercar. But I simply refuse to be raped by dealerships or even independent supercar garages. Mind you--here's a touch of my background: As a teenager I worked at a Firestone garage back when you could actually work on cars. In addition to working in my dad's auto body shop on the weekends from time to time I'm a pretty knowledgable guy. Short of a total engine breakdown, which I've never had to do, I can perform any mechanical job with relative ease.

My point is this: I'm considering getting formal training according to whatever supercar I choose to purchase. In case you don't know, I created another thread where I needed some advice on choosing the right gentleman's coupe. I've narrowed down my choices between an Aston Martin DBS and as Porsche 997 Turbo. There's the four step Universal Technical Institute approach, which is really long. Then there's the Porsche Technology Apprenticeship Program, which is an invitation only, 21 week program--Yeah right. And official Ferrari technician training? Forget it.

So, what I'm considering is just to collect as many hardcopy manuals, YouTube videos as possible and befriend a local independent exotic garage owner. I'll just develop my own damn curriculum and train myself. Has anyone else on L4P contemplated this endeavor or accomplished this feat?
 

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You can absolutely do this. My neighbor two homes down has 996 Turbo; he's an older financial services professional by trade, not someone you'd expect to know his way around a Porsche's underpinnings, but he's pulled and rebuilt the engine, swapped out the brakes, and every now and then I'll see some used parts out with his garbage. While there are some things which require specialized tooling, setups, or computer software, a lot can be accomplished independently through diligent research and careful work. Just be safe and respect the car, your skills, and your limits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You can absolutely do this. My neighbor two homes down has 996 Turbo; he's an older financial services professional by trade, not someone you'd expect to know his way around a Porsche's underpinnings, but he's pulled and rebuilt the engine, swapped out the brakes, and every now and then I'll see some used parts out with his garbage. While there are some things which require specialized tooling, setups, or computer software, a lot can be accomplished independently through diligent research and careful work. Just be safe and respect the car, your skills, and your limits.
Thanks for the reply! One thing I'm definitely a little nervous about would be dropping a 911 engine or even a V12. If worse came to worst I would more than likely strip the engine down and hand it off to someone else. Even if I had the time I wouldn't want to put that much money and space into major equipment. Other than probably a couple of specialized tools a mid level lift and an engine dolly is probably going to be it. Issues that would require some kind of Dr. Frankenstein-sized equipment will be handed off to an independent garage too. Everything short of dealing with the engine block and internals will be done by yours truly.
 

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Hate to play the devil's advocate with this, but I'll mention it anyways. I could do my own maintenance on my cars, but if I'm not absolutely set on keeping them, I take them to a dealer. Buyers love dealer maintenance records, even if the techs. are clueless. On a positive note, I can't comment on the AM, but maintenance isn't bad on the 997. You can find parts without being ripped a new one and won't have to worry about specialty tools every time you touch the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hate to play the devil's advocate with this, but I'll mention it anyways. I could do my own maintenance on my cars, but if I'm not absolutely set on keeping them, I take them to a dealer. Buyers love dealer maintenance records, even if the techs. are clueless. On a positive note, I can't comment on the AM, but maintenance isn't bad on the 997. You can find parts without being ripped a new one and won't have to worry about specialty tools every time you touch the car.
Understandable on the devil's advocate. For a while I was also the guy that turned in cars with excellent maintenance histories. In fact, I turned in my last Wrangler Unlimited in such great shape I got full asking price and $3000 off my then FX45. However, through all the peaks and valleys I've gone through with my cars my Acura CL type S has stood the test of time like Christie Brinkley. Almost completely trouble free and what little maintenance I had to perform I could do it almost with a knife and fork and a 50 dollar bill the job was so easy.

For a brief second I even thought about getting an F430 because it has a chain timing belt just to avoid having to change a rubber timing belt every 3 years in a Maranello. But everything else on the Ferrari is like working on an Indy Car. Just to give you an idea of how much of a quagmire a timing belt job is on a Ferrari here is a video, part 1 of a 4 part series, on a 348:

 

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Hate to play the devil's advocate with this, but I'll mention it anyways. I could do my own maintenance on my cars, but if I'm not absolutely set on keeping them, I take them to a dealer. Buyers love dealer maintenance records, even if the techs. are clueless. On a positive note, I can't comment on the AM, but maintenance isn't bad on the 997. You can find parts without being ripped a new one and won't have to worry about specialty tools every time you touch the car.
Is this not one that you have to pull the ENGINE to do plugs??
 

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Is this not one that you have to pull the ENGINE to do plugs??
Not if you pull the IC's and heat shields, after removing the bumper and wheel liners. I wouldn't consider it simple, but it can be done in a personal garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not if you pull the IC's and heat shields, after removing the bumper and wheel liners. I wouldn't consider it simple, but it can be done in a personal garage.

If you can rebuild a late model washer like this...then you can work on a 911 turbo engine. Just takes a little longer because of the bumper and wheel liners.




By the way, if anyone is wondering, yes, I did rebuild my washing machine in a couple hours. Turned out to be stress fractures in the tub. Probably would have cost over $1200 for two guys to come out from Sears, tear it down, replace the tub, and put it back together. Only cost me $90 and a couple days of waiting for the part to come.
 
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