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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be taking a photography class this semester at my local college and I've been trying to figure out what a good beginner camera would be. So far I've narrowed it down to the Canon Rebel T1i and the Nikon D5000. I would appreciate any help/advice from all you pros out there;)
 

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I started with a Rebel. the Nikon is probably just as good. (I am a Canon shooter)

One thing to keep in mind is... they are both great Camera makers... once you start buying lenses you will want to stick either or.

I really don't think it's about the camera but it's about your creativity and know how. Learn the camera and your gear, learn the rules.. and learn to break them once you know them well.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks!
I understand that its more the user then the camera that makes a picture great. I just want to make sure I get the camera that is best for my skill level.
 

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I'm a beginner as well, only be shooting seriously since around January. I have a Nikon D3000, the little guy, but from what I've learned so far is to spend your money on lenses. That way when you eventually upgrade your camera you still have top notch glass.
 

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Someone could sit here for hours and break down all the different specs of the cameras and tell you why different features are better/worse for different types of shooters allowing you to make the most effective choice but in the end that doesn't really matter.

When I bought my first SLR (a brand new Canon 20D when they were new) I researched a bit but since I didn't know much a lot of the data was useless to me.

So I went to a camera store and I played with a few cameras. In the end the 20D felt the best, the controls made the most sense, and the price was right so that's what I went with. I suggest giving that a try.

Both cameras are going to be pretty solid for an early shooter like you so getting into the Canon/Nikon thing is a bit pointless. Whatever is right for you is clearly the right answer so even if I take the best photos with my Canon you might not because the controls might not make sense to you as well as they did for me.

So go try them both out. That will be much for effective.
 

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So go try them both out. That will be much for effective.
This is the best advice you can get. The feel of the body and user interface is more comfortable to some rather than others. Personally I like the feel of the Nikons in my hands. Everyone is different, nothing wrong with that. Go out and give them a try.
 

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I bought my camera based on what a majority of my friends had. That way if I needed to borrow any equipment I could. You really can't go wrong either way with Canon or Nikon.
 

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Is Sony that bad? Seems like they have some new nice models out. I bought an early alpha because it was low investment, but like others have said, I've bought more and more lenses and now I don't know if I should upgrade my body and keep the lenses or cut bait and switch over entirely. I think alot of shortcomings are with me but can't be sure. Anyone wanna talk me into abandoning my Sony?
 

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Nikon D3S obviously.

Like people say, when the cameras are on the same level, its all person pref and most go with the ones they have used in the past. I like the controls and layout of my Nikon but I cant say I have played a lot with the Canons.

I want a Canon 7d right now though.
 

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Seriously, no one uses film cameras in school anymore? I loved working in that darkroom! Personally I think you should get the simplest, most manual camera that you can find so you can learn the nuances of focus, light metering, depth of field, ISO, shutter speed and f/ stop, lighting and composition. Then learn the chemistry side and the skill of using an enlarger and playing around with different types of paper, contrast filters, etc.

I guess I'm just old school.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the advice guys!
Seems like to me choosing a camera is almost like choosing the right motorcycle: go out and play around with the different ones and get whats most comfortable for you.

^^ I would not have the patience for all that lol I'm not trying to become a professional by any means. I just enjoy taking pictures of my car/bike/family.
 

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I'm no professional photographer but I learned all those concepts about photography in my 6th grade photo class. I would be seriously disappointed to learn that schools no longer teach the fundamentals of photography at the collegiate level. What department is offering this class? Is it titled "Digital Photography"? Just curious.

I am happy to hear that you are taking the time to "learn" to take better pictures and I'm sure we could all benefit at some level. Enjoy! Photography can be a life long hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow in the 6th grade? My middle school offered NO elective classes like that, not even a woodshop!

The title for the class is "Beginning Photography" They say a digital camera is preferred.
 

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wow 6th grade photo class? wish they offered it to me then.

I myself am a beginning photographer as well. I started out a before summer with a nikon D3000 and lived it from the beginning. Like some one said earlier though. if your going to choose a maker between canon and nikon (thats usually what it comes down to) make sure you stick with it because youll be buying lens for that camera.

right now im in a photo class at my local CC and our teacher explained " you will upgrade cameras every 3 years, but you will keep your lenses for 20" something to think about..
 

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I started out with a N75 Nikon, I received it as a gift from my father in a kit, at Christmas. It was great experience learning how to compose photos in my journalism, multi-media classes offered during my high school years. I still shot film until late 2006 when I purchased a D200, soley because I already had two nikon lenses. I don't care for canon, because for me, they don't feel right in my hand. I think the controls are a bit funky too.

The best advice has been offered, however, and that is to find a local shop and pick them up, take a few clicks, see how they feel and if its something you could easily carry around and be comfortable shooting through. Lenses will be your friend too, so my advice is to get a camera, used or new, that fits in your budget, but will allow you to purchase some nice glass to go along with it.


Brian
 

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dont buy new

cant really go wrong with cameras now but i would recommend a used 40d. its not as much the camera as it is the lense. invest in a good lense
 

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Nothing wrong w/ the D3000 (learned a lot on it) its a great price point and works well w/ a lot of the AF lenses- I dont think the D5000 has as much compatibility....
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the advice guys. I was leaning towards a used d300 or xs, but my father being the way he is wanted the latest and greatest. So we ended up getting a good deal on a Canon Rebel T1i. Came with 2 lenses and a bunch of other little goodies. I've been messing around with it the past 2 days and I'm extremely happy with it.

I would upload some pictures but for some reason they won't upload.
 

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Dont learn on a D300, as you dont appreciate it when you upgrade. I started on a D70 and appreciate my D300s so much more now!!!

Good job with the Rebel. Is that a 550d ? I prefer nikon though i always get the aparture / shutter speed dials the wrong way round lol.

Get a 50mm 1.8 so you can learn depth of field properly, you get shallow dof with the kit lens but not to the extreme of the nifty fifty.
 

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Forgot to add.

Never use auto mode, try and use M (manual) all the time. That way you learn as you shoot and you get to the point where you see a scene and you know what settings to shoot, then you get perfect exposures every time. Ive been doing this for a month and im nearly there, just ISO that confuses me slightly...
 
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