Luxury4Play.com banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,110 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
SO I Been wanting to play with final cut pro and I got my chance to sit down and play so I took the two videos below and changed them up into one with a lil music.

Let me know how I can improve and what you think?
Final product

sample videos

let me know what u think guys and gals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,110 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks it's instrumental from kanye west's new album.

I like both videos so I edited them together. Footage from 2 videos are not mine just ones I wanted to edit together and make my spin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,861 Posts
Now this is quality work. How do you sync the music with your film and do the cut exactly where you want them - is this noob user friendly with Final Cut?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
To be brutally honest it could be a lot better - but it seems like you really want to be a master one day so I'll give it to you straight. . .

-In the beginning, try using more static and close up shots, highlighting fine details and interesting features like the headlights and taillights. You could even use some of the shots of the engine being assembled - this could create a "building up" feeling that will produce more dramatic results when final, completed product is showcased afterwards.
- Use the drama in the music to your advantage. When the bass drops, cut to an awesome dramatic shot of the whole car. Maybe even blur out the shot right before the bass drops so there is "visual contrast" between the shots, which will be very dramatic for the viewer.

A couple more tricks:
- Make your cuts while the camera is still moving. There were a few shots you used where the camera went from a pan to a stand still, but if you notice in the official lambo movie of the engine, the shots were always in motion. This will create a much smoother flow. It's fine to use detail shots with little or no motion, but I always try to make moving shots always be moving and static shots always stay static with some focus/blurring added for depth and transitioning.

Also the best advice I could give is to watch a bunch of Top Gear and study the shots. In film class often times we would watch a short film and literally write down every detail for each shot, such as angle, audio, composition, length, etc. It really helps in the long run because when you understand how an entire storyboard is composed before you even start shooting, you have a great framework to fill with your creative genius :wink:

Hope this makes sense and good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,110 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Now this is quality work. How do you sync the music with your film and do the cut exactly where you want them - is this noob user friendly with Final Cut?

everytime the beat hit i used the mark tool to mark it. then edited it where the marks were.

To be brutally honest it could be a lot better - but it seems like you really want to be a master one day so I'll give it to you straight. . .

-In the beginning, try using more static and close up shots, highlighting fine details and interesting features like the headlights and taillights. You could even use some of the shots of the engine being assembled - this could create a "building up" feeling that will produce more dramatic results when final, completed product is showcased afterwards.
- Use the drama in the music to your advantage. When the bass drops, cut to an awesome dramatic shot of the whole car. Maybe even blur out the shot right before the bass drops so there is "visual contrast" between the shots, which will be very dramatic for the viewer.

A couple more tricks:
- Make your cuts while the camera is still moving. There were a few shots you used where the camera went from a pan to a stand still, but if you notice in the official lambo movie of the engine, the shots were always in motion. This will create a much smoother flow. It's fine to use detail shots with little or no motion, but I always try to make moving shots always be moving and static shots always stay static with some focus/blurring added for depth and transitioning.

Also the best advice I could give is to watch a bunch of Top Gear and study the shots. In film class often times we would watch a short film and literally write down every detail for each shot, such as angle, audio, composition, length, etc. It really helps in the long run because when you understand how an entire storyboard is composed before you even start shooting, you have a great framework to fill with your creative genius :wink:

Hope this makes sense and good luck!
thanks zbaums i need some critiiscm I thought it could be better but didnt know what.

I watch top gear alot so I need to take better notes for sure.

Again thanks everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,204 Posts
great video!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
cool video, i like it! The best part is...the more videos you make, the better they get! Cant wait to see what you can come up with a few months from now :wink:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top