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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanna make some sauces to go with some of my steaks.
the dilema is that I dont drink and my wife is a wine snob and doesnt know crap about cooking wines.

the wagyu i raise has a delicate flavor and I dont want to over power it with something acidic.

any suggestions?

recipes would be nice too lol.

Thanks
 

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In my past 6 years of learning about cooking and grilling/smoking in my spare time I've never found that any sauces benefit fine meat.

At the end of the day I spend more of my time on meat with self dry aging at home.
I don't do it as long as many do, usually about 8-10 days.

There's a great episode of good eats which Alton brown discusses dry aging but I couldn't find it.

I did find this though:
How to Dry Age Beef Alton Brown Style? | ifood.tv

I do the same thing with big roasts for special dinner parties.

Disclaimer: I am very much an amateur... this is IMHO.
 

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Oh and I've found that cooking wine is pretty straight forward. If you find sometihng less than $10 you're probably good to go. The subtleties of good wine are obviously not necessary when you're cooking a sauce.
 

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I subscribe to the school of thought that you shouldn't cook with anything you wouldn't drink.

Since you don't drink I would maybe try a simple balsamic reduction or perhaps a compound butter.

The balsamic reduction is a tasty option that is less acidic than you'd think.

A simple recipe is to reduce over medium low heat a medium bottle of mid-grade balsamic vinegar with a teaspoon of superfine sugar added once you see bubbles, a large finely diced shallot and a few grinds of black pepper. Make sure to stir until the sugar melts down and keep an eye on it so it doesn't burn.

If you are a purist or don't like small chunks of shallot then you can stick with just the vinegar and sugar.

A rolling bubble is fine. Also make sure not to get any sugar on the edges or inner sides of the pot because your reduction will climb it up and out onto your cook top. Once the reduction easily coats the back of a spoon taste it to make sure you are happy and take it off the heat stirring occasionally. It should be the consistency of cough syrup

When you are about to dress your steak with it you can add a pat of butter to silken it up a little if you want although with Wagyu you may not need to.

Compound butters are simple but be careful as they may overpower your marble.

Simply take your ice cold butter (I like Irish butter) and the herbs or spices you like and put them all in a bowl. Mash everything together until it's thoroughly mixed and then put it on some plastic wrap in as close to a log shape as you can get. Work quickly so you don't break down the butter too much. Wrap it tightly and leave it in your fridge until it resets. Slice off and top your steak to taste. Be careful with adding salt to the butter as it will melt it.

Last but not least, freshly grated horseradish is a simple and wonderful compliment to a great steak.

Good luck!
 

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big - start w/ 2 buck chuck - i doubt you'll notice much of a difference - if you want lighter, try a < $20 bottle pinot noir. but i agree w/ others - why ruin meat w/ sauce? (unless you're thickening the jus w/ real blood, in which case, go for it! something tells me that's not your style though :) )

civic - does your butcher not dry-age your steaks? i've thought about doing the Alton method but *much* easier (and probably safe) to just find a butcher that will dry-age to your specs (my current butcher does about 9 weeks on a side of rib-eye - buy the whole thing.)

armbar - do you really cook w/ $40+ bottles of wine? i do believe they could make a difference if you're an *excellent* cook (which it sounds like you might qualify indeed) but for the weekend warrior, do you find that it makes a noticeable difference?

- chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you are right chuck...its just that i eat a steak everyday...and you know how it goes...
even wagyu gets a lil ho hum....just wanted a way to spice it up...something different...tried everything other than a wine sauce..but had some at my neighbors that i liked a lot....i am not into jus..you are right.

i will go get some charles shaw..thanks

btw...you are not talking about dryaging wagyu are you?

those are some good ideas too armbar...thanks....cant wait for my steak tonight...my own thread is making me hungry lol
 

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btw...you are not talking about dryaging wagyu are you?

nope, i was referring to real steak :D

do you dry-age your wagyu at all? if so, what have you found to be the limits before the fat goes rancid?


interestingly, in Japan last year, i had something that was crazy - it was definitely wagyu but it had more minerality than my 9-week steaks. i have no idea what they did but it was like nirvana - the absolute best of both worlds.

- chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
nope, i was referring to real steak :D

do you dry-age your wagyu at all? if so, what have you found to be the limits before the fat goes rancid?


interestingly, in Japan last year, i had something that was crazy - it was definitely wagyu but it had more minerality than my 9-week steaks. i have no idea what they did but it was like nirvana - the absolute best of both worlds.

- chuck

no...thats why i asked....you should never dry age wag...it ruins it...the fat and meat gelatinizes and it becomes slimey...in a bad way.

I raise angus (black and red) also...and I dry age those...but i am working on this new method that will work like dry ageing and produce the same results in 1/3 the time...I will spill the beans when i get it perfected.

the minerality is based on what season fodder they feed the cattle. summer sweet...as it is saw spring....winter mineral...as the air dries out the sugars....and spring is the mix of both....fodder has started to gain sugar...but still holds the minerals......you wont want to know what those minerals are....trust me. :D

remember...you are not eating the cow but not tasting the cow...you are tasting what the cow tasted all its life.
 

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armbar - do you really cook w/ $40+ bottles of wine? i do believe they could make a difference if you're an *excellent* cook (which it sounds like you might qualify indeed) but for the weekend warrior, do you find that it makes a noticeable difference?

- chuck
Chuck, I don't typically uncork and cook with a $40+ bottle of wine but often times when a bit is left in the bottle from the previous day or something like that, the remainder makes it into a dish or a sauce.

If I am buying a specific wine for a dish I don't necessarily go high end but the wine comes from eye level in the wine section and not the herb/ spice/ seasoning aisle if you know what I mean.

As far as being an "excellent" cook, I'll leave that to the diners to decide. I did my time in the industry and can hold my own in both a home and professional kitchen but past that I'm just a guy that likes to eat great food and drink great drinks.
 

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big - start w/ 2 buck chuck - i doubt you'll notice much of a difference - if you want lighter, try a < $20 bottle pinot noir. but i agree w/ others - why ruin meat w/ sauce? (unless you're thickening the jus w/ real blood, in which case, go for it! something tells me that's not your style though :) )

civic - does your butcher not dry-age your steaks? i've thought about doing the Alton method but *much* easier (and probably safe) to just find a butcher that will dry-age to your specs (my current butcher does about 9 weeks on a side of rib-eye - buy the whole thing.)

armbar - do you really cook w/ $40+ bottles of wine? i do believe they could make a difference if you're an *excellent* cook (which it sounds like you might qualify indeed) but for the weekend warrior, do you find that it makes a noticeable difference?

- chuck
@Chuck: I wish I could purchase dry aged meat but since I like hosting and I'm but a poor medical resident I have to age things myself.

When dry aging I usually use a small refrigerator that I used to use just for drinks and whatnot. If I could afford the $25-30 per pound cost of having others age for me I'd definitely do it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@Chuck: I wish I could purchase dry aged meat but since I like hosting and I'm but a poor medical resident I have to age things myself.

When dry aging I usually use a small refrigerator that I used to use just for drinks and whatnot. If I could afford the $25-30 per pound cost of having others age for me I'd definitely do it!
where do you live in texas? i might have some great solutions for you. might be cheaper in the long run for you too.
 

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Chuck, I don't typically uncork and cook with a $40+ bottle of wine but often times when a bit is left in the bottle from the previous day or something like that, the remainder makes it into a dish or a sauce.

If I am buying a specific wine for a dish I don't necessarily go high end but the wine comes from eye level in the wine section and not the herb/ spice/ seasoning aisle if you know what I mean.

As far as being an "excellent" cook, I'll leave that to the diners to decide. I did my time in the industry and can hold my own in both a home and professional kitchen but past that I'm just a guy that likes to eat great food and drink great drinks.
That's a great idea for use of leftovers from a nice bottle...

I rarely get a chance to drink $40 + bottles everything I drink has to be $20 or less or I'd put myself in the pourhouse.

I like your suggestions for compound butters. I've always found that they're a great thing to have in the freezer or fridge to add on!
 

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where do you live in texas? i might have some great solutions for you. might be cheaper in the long run for you too.
I live in the Houston area. Galleria.

One of my best friends and I were talking about getting a cow and sharing it but my girlfriend eats only things that fly or swim, my buddy lives all the way in Lubbock, and we live in a nice but small 2 BR apartment with no room for a subzero.
 

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the minerality is based on what season fodder they feed the cattle. summer sweet...as it is saw spring....winter mineral...as the air dries out the sugars....and spring is the mix of both....fodder has started to gain sugar...but still holds the minerals......you wont want to know what those minerals are....trust me. :D

remember...you are not eating the cow but not tasting the cow...you are tasting what the cow tasted all its life.

i've always thought about this (food is product of both environment & season, and inputs - eg - what they eat) but never thought about the minerals themselves - and the effect seasons might have on it.

thanks - learn something every day.


but there's definitely a lot more minerality when comparing two pieces of the same beef - one dry-aged longer than the other. i *thought* that's what i tasted w/ that crazy wagyu - but now i'm very curious re: your comments.

we know the Japanese are crazy (in a good way) so maybe there was some super secret special nuclear grade food stuff they used to achieve that taste.


- chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
i've always thought about this (food is product of both environment & season, and inputs - eg - what they eat) but never thought about the minerals themselves - and the effect seasons might have on it.

thanks - learn something every day.


but there's definitely a lot more minerality when comparing two pieces of the same beef - one dry-aged longer than the other. i *thought* that's what i tasted w/ that crazy wagyu - but now i'm very curious re: your comments.

we know the Japanese are crazy (in a good way) so maybe there was some super secret special nuclear grade food stuff they used to achieve that taste.


- chuck
no..its nothing super crazy...hell most of the crazy kobe bs...its just bs..

the type of wagyu i raise (tajima ushi) is pretty high in minerals to begin with...but i believe the fodder i use (my secret) makes it that much better.

to me beef unami are the minerals.

i am guessing you just ate a fluke....sometimes...certain seasons, certain fodder, and certain genetics come together to make some orgasmic stuff.......the ranchers special reserve :D

I got a big lock on that freezer room :D

There are only 3 breeders of Tajima ushi outside kobe and mie (matasusaka) ..two are in australia..and I am the other one...only one in the the americas.
tajima ushi is the real kobe beef....wagyu just means beef from japan....but there are many breeds of wagyu...most people dont realize that. so they think all wagyu will taste like kobe...thats simply not the case.
 

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@Big - How can I get some of your beef?
 

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^^

Wow - I set myself up on that one. Let me rephrase. How can I purchase some of the beef from the cows you raise.
 
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