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  1. #21
    TheYeti is offline Senior Member
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    If you get the chance could you write a breakdown of model types, overall production numbers for each type and what years each type was in production? Including variations in build design and each new types intended purpose if you wouldnt mind. Thank you in advance.

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    Antontell is offline Junior Member
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    Oh, i forgot to say that the picture were taken 2006. But I didn't take it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Antontell View Post
    Maybe this is Claes Wachtmeister's F1?

    The foto is taken in the middle of the summer in Sweden, Stockholm. Just outside of "Autoropa AB", the official salesman of Ferrari and Maserati in Sweden.

    https://www.luxury4play.com/attachmen...1&d=1262532192
    You are indeed correct - I believe that it was snapped the day he sold the car and it started it's little SPS journey. There were 4 or 5 shots in that set.

    >8^)
    ER

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheYeti View Post
    If you get the chance could you write a breakdown of model types, overall production numbers for each type and what years each type was in production? Including variations in build design and each new types intended purpose if you wouldnt mind. Thank you in advance.
    Great idea for the start of the thread - get the basics out of the way.

    Why didn't I think of that?

    It's easy enough to just repost something I put together a while ago:

    McLaren F1 Total Production:

    7 Prototypes = 5 F1 road cars (XP1-XP5), one F1 LM (XP1 LM), and one F1 GT long tail road car (56XPGT)

    64 Roadcars (Normal versions with "Short" bodywork) - note that some of these cars have since been converted with the 'High Downforce LM-kit'.

    28 GTRs (Racecars) - This includes the 9 '95-spec GTR's, the 9 '96-spec GTRs, and the 10 '97-spec long tailed GTRs. Again - many of these cars have since been converted by the factory for road use, but that doesn't change their original designation as GTRs.

    5 LMs (lightweight and more powerful roadcars -- 2336 lbs vs. 2495 lb, 680 bhp and 520 lb/ft vs 627 bhp and 479 lb/ft). These cars were constructed to commemorate the McLaren F1's debut participation at Le Mans in 1995, where 5 GTRs completed the race -- finishing 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 13th.

    2 F1 GTs (roadcars with "Long" bodywork similar to 1997 GTR racecars).

    1 Spare Chassis

    TOTAL: 106 cars

    Breakdown by year -

    1992 = XP1

    1993 = XP2-XP5, 1 F1 road car

    1994 = 24 F1 road cars

    1995 = 15 F1 road cars, 9 '95-spec F1 GTRs, 1 '96-spec F1 GTR, F1 LM prototype 'XP1 LM'

    1996 = 7 F1 road cars, 8 '96-spec F1 GTRs, 5 F1 LMs, 1 '97-spec GTR long tail

    1997 = 9 '97-spec GTR long tails, 11 F1 road cars, F1 GT prototype '56XPGT', 2 F1 GTs

    1998 = 6 F1 road cars, 1 spare chassis
    However it's better to spell it out in a little more detail I think.

    One thing that is important for people to realize, is that when the F1 project started McLaren's only intention was to build F1 road cars. Gordon has actually stated that he told Ron Dennis and the rest of the team early-on not to come back to him later on and ask for a racer, as he was designing certain compromises into the car for road use that would work against it on the track (and of course now most of us know how successful it went on to become). About a year into production of the F1s, it was a small group of 2-3 customers who pressed McLaren into building a racer for use in the gentlemen's BPR series that started evolving around '93-'94 by essentially threatening to do it themselves without McLaren's support if they didn't wish to be involved. McLaren realized that in their effort to sell their road cars and control the image of the brand, that if someone else was out there commanding the race effort and it was not successful, that it would surely hurt their ability to sell the car. That is why they finally agreed to have a go with it. Had that little discussion from those three individuals never occurred, its likely there wouldn't be many things to talk about when it comes to "variants" of the F1.

    I like to use visual aids to help with the story, and there can be no better visuals to outline the variants than these three shots taken from above.



    We'll start with the first one - as it shows all the official variants of the F1 as they were originally conceived. Three more (I'll call them) psuedo-variants would come along later in life, again at the wishes of certain customers.

    Front and center is the 'basic' McLaren F1 road car. In total, 69 were originally built if you include the 5 prototypes (XP1-XP5). That means 64 were production cars - the one pictured here, being the ever-popular silver and having no other uniquely distinguishing outward features is a mystery when it comes to the exact chassis number. The road cars featured a 627-hp 6.1L V12 from BMW Motorsports designated "S70/2" that would form the basis for all the other engines.

    An interesting detail of note is that chassis numbers for the production road cars start at #001 and finish at #075.

    "How can that be?" you say "You just told us there were 64."

    Well this was due to a couple reasons. The first that there were some chassis that had been intended to be road cars, but were reassigned and became the earliest GTRs instead, and then that road car number was never re-used. Also, a few were just skipped over with no explanation given, and then three of the numbers match up with the chassis numbers given to the F1 GTs. Also, the road cars were not built in sequence based on their chassis number, in fact the very first F1 completed in December 1993 was #002, then in the beginning of 1994, #003 was completed, followed finally by #001. Con-fus-ing!


    In the center of the image is an example of the 1995 F1 GTR - this is really the car that started it all, as that is GTR #01R pictured. It was the first GTR built, though it looked like this when originally unveiled. GTR #01R was the prototype GTR and like my story about #19R above, it didn't see any competitive use initially. Through a bit of chance, this chassis would end up being entered into the 1995 24Hrs of LeMans and was the car that Lehto/Dalmas/Sekiya trio took to victory and that was the only race it ever competed it. It's often referred to as the 'UenoClinic' GTR now, as that's the name of the company that sponsored it at LeMans. Don't Google it though, unless you need to learn more about "Penile Implants" - yeah, I am serious! Eventually, McLaren would build 9 of these 1995-spec GTRs; 8 of them have racing history, and the last (#09R) was constructed for the Brunei Royal Family as a replica of the LeMans winner, as Ron Dennis preferred to keep the original car that won with McLaren.


    I've mentioned already that 5 F1 GTRs finished the 1995 LeMans race which was an amazing achievement. To celebrate this McLaren decided to build the road going version of the GTR, known as the F1 LM pictured front-right here. The LM is not just a road car with a bodykit, nor is it just a GTR with a license plate. It's really the best combination of both, and it also features the most powerful version of the F1's V12, officially rated at 680hp. It features three seats, unlike the GTRs which can only manage two due to the placement of wires and control boxes in the seat to driver's right. It has a unique interior treatment with fully exposed carbon fiber, lacks the roll cage fitted to the GTRs, and has some little unique styling elements here and there. They also kept the harsly loud straight-cut gearbox that was fitted to the GTRs, requiring an in-car headset communication system by Peltor in order for driver and passengers to communicate at speed.

    The one pictured here is the prototype, chassis XP1 LM built late in 1995, and then they built five production versions in mid-1996 which wear chassis LM1-LM5. It's often stated, even in materials released by McLaren, that all the LMs were this Historic 'Papaya' Orange color as a tribute to the early McLaren orange paint their successful CAN-AM cars wore, but this is inaccurate as two were painted Black. We can cover that later though.


    Down front, in Blood Red, is the first of the 1996 model GTRs, chassis #10R. These moved the bar much further towards being a real racer than the 1995 GTRs had been. Going back a bit, development of the original GTRs was given a budget by Dennis based on the 'profit' of selling just five cars. This gave Gordon just one day in the wind tunnel to work on the aerodynamics, and most of the changes made to the cars were to allow it to meet the standards required on track, like fitting a roll cage, and trying to make certain parts more durable. With the 1996 GTR effort, McLaren had never really stopped developing the car throughout the previous year, and realized there were changes that would benefit it on track like the further lowering of the engine in the chassis, and a better focus on reducing the weight among other things, which made building a whole new car a requirement for the second year. Some of the 1995 GTR customers traded up for the new car, but McLaren also created a package of upgrades for the '95s that wanted to continue on racing. In total, 9 of these 1996-spec GTRs were built.

    The one pictured again acted as the development car and it's only real racing history occurred at the Pre-Qualifying event for the 1996 24Hrs of LeMans held early in the year, where it filled in for another GTR that actually competed. The car originally looked like this when unveiled in what is referred to as its "Presentation Livery", but it wasn't a popular look for the car and the yellow markings and painted wheels were removed early on. This car now belongs to drummer Nick Mason of Pink Floyd, and after a recent brush with death at the hands of a journalist that required some repairs it has been returned to its original glory with all the yellow bits added back on. I applaud that decision!

    <continued below>
    Last edited by Peloton25; 01-06-2010 at 01:34 PM.

  6. #25
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    The final two were almost a tie, but I'll go with the order of when they were manufacturered. The car in the back-right corner of the image is an example of the 1997-spec longtail F1 GTR; in this case GTR #20R wearing it's 'Gulf-Davidoff' livery from the 1997 24Hrs of LeMans. The 1997 GTRs were obviously a large departure from the earlier racers, but were not a total clean sheet design. While the longtail bodywork doesn't strike everyone's fancy, it does serve a purpose in allowing the F1 GTR to hold its own against the increased competition from Porsche's 911 GT1 and Mercedes Benz' CLK-GTR and other purpose-built race cars that were beginning to steal pieces of the F1s glory and earlier domination in the sportscar racing series of the day. It also elicited this comment from Gordon Murray: "The first time I saw the '97 'Longtail' prototype accelerating past the pits at Barcelona - slightly nose up - with that wonderful, rising, piercing V12 shriek, I finally thought 'That's it - we've cracked it. We've finally turned the F1 into a real racer.'" Not only was the car longer and more aerodynamic, but it was surprisingly considerably lighter than the more road-car based GTRs of the earlier two years (published weights for the three versions went from 1050kg, to 1012kg, to finally 915kg on the longtails).

    The V12 engines fitted to GTRs were all dubbed "S70/3" even though each revision had seen steady performance improvements from BMW over the years. Despite that work, all of them were rated at 600hp. Because of the size of the F1s V12, they were handicapped from the get-go with air-restrictors due to sanctioning rules that reduced the power to less than that of a road car. In the case of the 1997 variant, displacement actually was reduced to 5990cc from the tradition 6064cc of all other F1 engines by shortening the stroke slightly, getting it under the 6.0L bar. I believe this was to allow a slightly larger air inlet than it would have gotten being over than mark, and changed mapping to the ignition and fuel curves and other internals for increased performance where it matter. The smaller engine suffered a bit losing 21lb-ft of torque at its peak though, but BMW had also made significant weight reductions in the engine to counter act that in what was probably a delicate balancing act of weight -vs- performance.

    Another big change to the longtail GTRs was the fitment of a sequential gearbox, developed by Xtrac, which improved shifting and helped with reliability of the F1s transmission that had always been a bit of an Achilles' heel in the longer racing events. The longtails were nearly successful in their quest to beat their improved rivals - one of them finishing second overall to a CLK-GTR in the 1997 FIA GT Championship series, and one taking the top honors in the GT1 Class at the '97 24Hrs of LeMans. In total, I think I have mentioned already that 10 of these were built, finishing the GTRs chassis number run at #28R.


    Now the last car in that image of six was built by McLaren to satisfy the homologation requirements of the FIA GT series. Since the longtail GTR was such a departure from the regular F1, a requirement in the rules stated that in order to race this new car they had to build a new road car that matched, sell one a month before the first race, have dealers, brochures and parts back-up for it. This very special variant is called the F1 GT, and commonly referred to as the longtail road car.

    The one pictured and in the second shot way up there with the other road cars might appear to be black, but I can assure you it is dark green, making it chassis 56XPGT. That was essentially the prototype for the F1 GT, and then two additional customer cars were built, one of them went to McLaren's best customer the Brunei Royal Family and was in fact black. The other went to Japan and was painted Burgundy originally, but was recently in the past couple of years refitted by the factory for its original owner with a paint scheme resembling the McLaren Formula One cars from the Mika Hakkinen era. I'm sure there will be a point later on where sharing photos of it will occur either by me or someone else.

    The styling of the GT is again an acquired taste. Some openly do not like it at all, whereas others find it to be their favorite of all. I think the longtails look better as racers, but understand and appreciate why the GTs were made and with only three built, it was definitely the most exclusive of the original F1 variants.

    = = = = =

    Since production of the F1s ceased in mid-1998, the McLaren Customer Care group that continues to support and maintain F1s has managed to come up with a few new psuedo-variants based on customer's requests. These deserve to be mentioned, mainly because seeing one can confuse people as to which of the six categories above they fall into.


    For starters, McLaren developed an option for the F1 road car called the 'High Downforce Kit' that included the deep nose splitter, wider front wheel arches and rear wing, matching the aerodynamic styling elements fitted to the short tailed F1 GTRs and the LM. Also, except with one particular F1 that didn't get the wider front wheel arches, they also changed the wheels from the standard 17" to wear a set of the 18" OZ included on the GTRs.

    There were other changes that aren't as obivious that go along with this, like the deletion of the 'Brake Balance Foil' at the rear, and lowering/stiffening of the suspension slightly in order to make it all work best together. I am aware of 10 F1s that have been upgraded with this option - all but one of the chassis numbers are known. It should also be noted that no F1 road car was originally completed with the High Downforce Kit fitted - they were all added later on during refits.

    One owner recently chose to have the Kit removed, returning the car to stock, which is pretty surprising.


    Now of those 10... (errr, 9 now) two of the cars are even more heavily modified by McLaren to really become the ultimate variant of the F1. They feature the addition of an LM-spec engine, giving them near equal performance to the fastest F1 variant without some of the drawbacks of the LMs raw and sparsely finished interior, or any lack of creature comforts. Unlike the LMs, they do not have the straight cut gearboxes borrowed from the GTR that make communication inside the car nearly impossible at speed. The Downforce Kit on these cars was enhanced with louvers over the front wheel arches in the style used on the longtails to improve downforce, and McLaren called it the "Extra-High Downforce Kit" because of that.

    Now these two cars don't have a fancy name like "F1 GT" and they should never simply be called "F1 LMs" since they are not the same. McLaren spent a lot of time on these two conversions and certainly could have fitted an "F1 LM" badge to the rear of each, but chose not too. Here's a photo of each car - #018 first, #073 second. Now, after all that, I must ask that you please ignore the platform underneath #073 where it says "McLaren F1 LM".




    The final new variant that should be mentioned are the road-converted F1 GTRs. These confuse people for different reasons - but the primary one is because many of them have been resprayed in Historic 'Papaya' Orange making them instantly look like an F1 LM to the slightly-informed car enthusiast.

    There are a total of 9 GTRs that have been converted. Some by the factory, others by private firms. They are all based on short tailed '95 or '96 GTRs. It has been said that converting a '97 GTR would be impossible, but I guess that depends on what set of regulatory standards you are trying to comply with as some are less stringent than others for road registration.

    The chassis numbers of the converted GTRs are #06R, #07R, #08R, #10R, #11R, #12R, #13R, #14R and #16R. From that listing, the ones that are not 'Orange' (as it is a shorter list) are #06R, #10R, #12R and #13R. In each case for those four, they still wear what would be described as their original race livery, sans most sponsor decals and race numbers. GTR #16R has recently changed hands and there have been suggestions that it will possibly see a return to its original livery as well, or maybe something else. We'll have to wait and see what its new owner decides.

    That covers what could be considered all the variants in a moderate level of detail. If you want further clarification on any points, just ask.

    >8^)
    ER
    Last edited by Peloton25; 05-06-2010 at 06:27 PM.

  7. #26
    Poisoned Pony is offline Member
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    Peloton, I've seen you've post on various other forums and your knowledge of the F1 is amazing. If there is anyone that should write an "Ultimate McLaren F1" guide, it should be you.

    I'll have to go digging through my photo archives, but I have a pic of the 1st and only F1 I've seen in person. It was a black example, displayed at the Blackhawk Auto museum. It was a driven one, as I remember seeing the scrapes on the splitter. If memory serves me correctly it was 2002 when I saw it and was a local owned example

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Pony View Post
    Peloton, I've seen you've post on various other forums and your knowledge of the F1 is amazing. If there is anyone that should write an "Ultimate McLaren F1" guide, it should be you.
    Thanks! It seems like I'll be getting around to doing that right here in this thread perhaps.

    Would appreciate seeing that photo you mention, which will be of chassis #072. There are only a few in circulation from it's short time while displayed at the Blackhawk and so you were quite lucky to see that car there.

    The story if you don't know it is actaully kind of sad as to how it got there. The car's proud owner was a young guy in his mid-30's who made his money in the internet world. Here's a snippet pulled from an article in BusinessWeek Magazine written in 2003.

    Just when Commerce One hit the skids, co-founder Thomas Gonzales Jr. died of a rare form of cancer. Last Dec. 13, more than 600 friends and colleagues gathered for an evening memorial service at the Blackhawk Auto Museum in the hills east of San Francisco. Like the treasures of a pharaoh, Gonzales' prize possessions, F1 McLaren and Ferrari F50 sports cars, were placed on display -- as were drawings of the dream house he never got to build.

    At the end, people lingered in the parking lot in the dark. For some, this was the ultimate downer. Gonzales grew up poor in a cabin in California's Sierras. He had worked hard. He was a team player -- always ready to stay up all night to finish a project or fly to any city to show the company's newest technology to potential customers. And thanks to the Internet gold rush, he had attained wealth beyond his dreams. Now he had died way too young. "When Thomas died, something died within the company. The spirit went out," says Biestman.

    Indeed, the Blackhawk farewell is a fitting epitaph for a whole generation of Internet startups. They came. They soared. And, like Commerce One, they're in danger of fading away without fulfilling their promise.
    The F1, I was told a few years back, remains in the USA still with his family and is in permanent storage somewhere in the Western USA. It has not been seen/photographed to my knowledge since about 2004 though.

    >8^)
    ER
    Last edited by Peloton25; 01-03-2010 at 06:11 PM.

  9. #28
    Poisoned Pony is offline Member
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    wow, sad story indeed! I'll search through my archives. I remember seeing it during a local stop for Ford's Living Legends tour. I was there to see the prototype for the 2003 Mach 1 and the 2003 Ford GT and the McLaren happened to be there inside by the FGT

  10. #29
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    Glad too see you hear bud.

    - Russ
    Russ

  11. #30
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    Thanks Russ - it's a nice forum and I'm glad to have "arrived".

    ** Moving this question over from the "Dream Garage" thread to provide an answer and any further discussion in here. **

    Quote Originally Posted by JGiefer View Post
    Peloton, I love you. Seriously, I rarely come across someone who enjoys cars at the level you do. I was wondering though, I live in Monterey, CA, and there's a orange F1 that I've seen twice near 17 Mile Drive and stuff, know anything on it? The driver is very quick with it; the first time I saw him he floored it at the light go uphill, was amazing.

    J.
    Thanks!

    When did you see these things happen? Recently, or several years ago - like maybe 2003 during the Pebble Beach weekend?

    If a standard road car, then it is almost certainly chassis #038, pictured here in the driveway of Dan Kennedy. As noted in the garage thread, and mentioned above in the New England area breakdown, it's had at least 3 owners since DK sold it in early 2005 (one in Texas briefly, then one in Atlanta for a bit longer) and has sort of fallen off the radar with wherever it resides currently.

    I do believe it is still in the USA. As recent as 2007 it was displayed at a car show in the North East I am forgetting the name of. As to the current owner, I have a name that I have been told should be it and he is someone that you might expect would and could buy a car like the F1, but it is not yet confirmed.

    EDIT: Found the name of the show - Fairfield County Concours d'Elegance held at the Fairfield County Hunt Club in West Port, CT - and here are the pair of photos from Sept 17th, 2007 where it won the "Best In Class - 1976-2007" award.





    >8^)
    ER
    Last edited by Peloton25; 01-03-2010 at 09:12 PM.

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