The First McLaren Senna for North America has Arrived

Michael Fux in New York City has taken delivery of the first North American McLaren Senna.

Sporting a full visual carbon fiber body, the Senna has received bespoke content from McLaren Special Operations, including a custom emerald green tint known as “Fux Green.” According to the British automaker, the full body set is comprised of 67 parts and takes almost 1,000 hours to produce. Further accenting the exterior of the car are blue and red wheel center lock nuts and ball polished wheels.

The body color theme is carried into the cabin, with “Fux Green” tinted carbon in gloss finish, contrasted by bright white leather accents on the seats, door uppers, and steering wheel. Contrast stitching on the seats and steering wheel has been done in green. Carbon black Alcantara can also be seen throughout the cabin, including the headliner, while the door struts and rear-view mirror have been painted green.

Powered by a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 engine, the McLaren Senna produces 789 brake horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque, while tipping the scales with a dry weight of 2,641 pounds. The Senna does zero-to-60 mph in 2.7 seconds and has aerodynamic components capable of producing up to 1,763.7 lbs of downforce.

Fux, who is an entrepreneur, philanthropist, and renowned car collector, also has a bespoke McLaren 720S with a custom fuchsia exterior color known as “Fux Fuchsia.” Other McLarens in his collection include a 12C in McLaren Orange and a 12C Spider in bespoke purple.

Look for the first North American McLaren Senna to make its public debut at The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering during Monterey Car Week in late August.

“We’re pleased to be here to officially deliver the first McLaren Senna in the North American market,” said Tony Joseph, president, McLaren North America. “This is such a special car – designed and engineered to be the ultimate road-legal track car ever produced by McLaren. We know that owners can’t wait to get their cars on the circuit, and we’re eager for them to get behind the wheel.”

a version of this article first appeared on AutoGuide

Comments

comments