During the Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este 2018 I have filmed this beautiful Ferrari 250 GTO. Considering that a 250 GTO switches owner for roughly $50 million, this would be the most expensive car on the world. But than you didn't knew about the story of the most expensive car crash!

One of the stars of the tracks of the 1960s was a Ferrari 250 GTO which has just emerged from a two-year-plus renovation at the Ferrari Classiche department, ready to return to its owner in America. During its stay in Maranello, the car was restored to the original engine and bodywork configuration in which it was delivered to Bologna-based publisher Luciano Conti in 1962. The latter also drove it in its maiden race, the Bologna-Passo della Raticosa.

In June 1962, however, Chassis no. 3445 was sold to Count Giovanni Volpi di Misurata, a passionate racing driver, who competed under the S.S.S. Repubblica di Venezia insignia. During this particular stage of its career, the car also won the Trophée d'Auvergne with Carlo Maria Abate at its wheel.

In April 1963, the 250 GTO was purchased by Swede Ulf Norinder who, to comply with the racing regulations of the day, changed its livery from the original red to blue and yellow colours of Sweden. Mr Norinder then drove it to victory in the Vastkustloppet in his home nation. The car also finished second twice in the Targa Florio (with Bordeu and Scarlatti in 1963, and 1964 with Norinder and Pico Troiberg, the latter time as no. 112 which it still bears today).

This much is known: In 2012, while competing in a vintage road rally near Blois, France, American Christopher Cox and his wife, Ann, were injured when their 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO collided with a passenger car. The crash was severe enough to leave Ann Cox with broken bones, and while images of the accident are essentially nonexistent, damage to the car’s front and right side was said to be considerable.

When it comes to the repair of such a valuable Ferrari, the best source may well be Ferrari itself; now, over two years later, Ferrari Classiche has announced the completion of repairs to Cox’s GTO.

Media outlets wasted no time in calling the July 2012 incident the “world’s most expensive car crash,” thanks to the lofty value of the Ferrari 250 GTO. Two months prior to the accident, in May of 2012, another Ferrari 250 GTO (built for Stirling Moss) sold in a private transaction for a reported $35 million. That’s not to say that Cox’s car, which lacked the celebrity driver provenance, carried an identical value, but as one of just 36 Ferrari 250 GTOs built (39 if one counts the three 330 GTOs), chassis 3455GT was still worth a significant amount of money and represented an important chapter of Ferrari’s racing history.

To ensure its continued value, Cox entrusted Ferrari Classiche, a division of the Maranello-based automaker that specializes in maintenance, repair and restoration of classic Ferraris. The two-year repair involved far more than just panel beating, as Ferrari Classiche claimed the repair order also returned the car to the original engine and bodywork configuration present at its 1962 delivery. The Swedish national livery was added by a later owner, Ulf Norinder, who acquired chassis 3455GT in April of 1963.

It was under Norinder’s ownership that the car saw its greatest racing successes, achieving a victory at Vastkustloppet, Sweden, and a pair of podium finishes in the 1963 and 1964 Targa Florio. In the years since, the Ferrari has been enjoyed by a variety of owners around the globe, with most exercising the car regularly at vintage events.

Cox, who purchased chassis 3455GT in June of 2005, continued the tradition, and it’s oddly fitting that the car was damaged during a motorsport event highlighting the 50th anniversary of the Ferrari GTO.

It’s impossible to know exactly how much Ferrari Classiche charged for repairs (or even if the at-fault driver’s insurance put a dent in the repair costs), but it’s safe to say that a factory restoration negates any doubt over the car’s future net worth.