Price: $35,525 (Base: $25,765)

Engine: 3.6-liter V6

Transmission: 5-speed Automatic

Power: 305 hp & 268 lb-ft of torque

Say what you will about the onslaught of revamped classics, but I think that some automotive manufacturers deserve some props. One brand that has done their classics right is Dodge. From the Charger to the Challenger, I think these are excellent cars and that is why I was excited when the 2013 Dodge Challenger RallyE Redline pulled up for me to review.
On the outside, the Challenger stays true to its original design. From the front to the back, it screams "muscle," just like its daddy. The RallyE Redline version features a big ol' red stripe going down the center of the car, two hood scoops, and dual exhaust with some rather large tips. The one feature that really caught my eye was the 20-inch aluminum wheels that were just about covered in red accents. If a random person saw this car in a parking lot, most would think it just came from a custom shop.
The classic styling continues on the interior of the car, offering a basic, yet functional design. There are no bells-and-whistles, no alcantara trim, its very simple and that isn't a bad thing. Instead of adding sleek lines to the dashboard and random useless buttons, Dodge decided to make it very "to the point," only adding some vents, the minimalistic center console, gauge cluster, and light switches. The seats were comfortable and hugged the driver and passenger quite well, like most muscle cars. For the audiophiles, our RallyE Redline came with the Harman Kardon option which gave us 18 speakers, including subwoofers and a Harman Kardon Logic7 GreenEdge amplifier.

While this car looks like a muscle car, I can't necessarily say that it acts like one. The RallyE Redline edition packs a 3.6-liter V6 engine, putting out 305 hp and 268 lb-ft of torque through a 5-speed automatic transmission. While this is a decent amount, you have to remember that this is a huge car, having a length of 16.5 ft and weighing in at around 5,000lbs. Acceleration is a tad sluggish and the overall feel of the engine is almost lackluster. From the outside, you would imagine this car only being fitted with a huge V8 that growls when started, but instead you get a mediocre V6 that won't even wake a cat when started. I know that there is the SRT8 392 version that is a true muscle car, but I just hate to see such a mean looking exterior go to waste. However, there is a bright side, because this car does get a decent 18/27 mpg. As far as handling goes, I will say that it is much better than the SXT, thanks to upgraded suspension, steering and braking systems.
Overall, while I was disappointed with the torque and sound of the engine, I did enjoy this car. It has a badass exterior, and a simple interior that didn't draw my eyes away from the road in front of me. Dodge has done a great job re-imagining this classic muscle car, and I expect to see it around for a few more years.




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